Posted by on 1 Dec 2011. Filed under Current Affairs, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Bad Rank For Slovakia in Corruption Perceptions Index

A common practice in Slovakia (c) The Daily

Transparency International has published its Corruption Perceptions Index 2011, with Slovakia finding itself fifth worse in the European Union behind Italy, Romania, Bulgaria and Greece, and 66th overall from the 183 assessed countries. Slovakia is also now behind the rest of the Visegrad Four, with the Polish up in 41st place, Hungary in 54th and the Czech Republic in 57th.

In response to the latest results, Transparency International Slovensko made a call to political parties as forewarning before the elections in March 2012: “Our ranking at the tail-end of the countries of the Visegrad 4 and also the EU in the latest Corruption Perception Index sends out a signal to political parties in the pre-election campaign to treat the fight against corruption as a key factor when making nominations to their candidate lists, and in preparing their election manifestos.”

The bad placement of Slovakia in the index could very well reflect on investments as many global companies consider it before making decisions.

Transparency International points out how the protests that marked 2011 show anger at corruption in politics and public sector Berlin, as corruption continues to plague too many countries around the world. It shows some governments failing to protect citizens from corruption, be it abuse of public resources, bribery or secretive decision-making.

Transparency International warned that protests around the world, often fuelled by corruption and economic instability, clearly show citizens feel their leaders and public institutions are neither transparent nor accountable enough.

“This year we have seen corruption on protestors’ banners be they rich or poor. Whether in a Europe hit by debt crisis or an Arab world starting a new political era, leaders must heed the demands for better government,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International.

You can get the full report here

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