Posted by on 22 Nov 2012. Filed under Politics, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Former Attorney General Suspect in Dubious Property Deal

Former Attorney General Dobroslav Trnka is at  the centre of yet another suspicious case of crony practices involving the transfer of a block of flats to a company linked to well-connected businessman Marian Kocner.

Former AG Dobroslav Trnka

Trnka, who is currently deputy attorney general, is being accused of abusing public office after allowing the transfer of a block of flats in Bernolakovo called Glance House, despite the property being frozen in a dispute between the partners of the developer. Trnka gave his consent to the transfer to Jana Šlachtová, representing the partner CDI from London.

A copy of Trnka’s letter permitting the unusual transaction has been obtained by daily SME, but he had no legal authority to grant consent and it was done without the knowledge of the investigating Special Prosecutor’s Office, which only found out about the situation by chance recently.

The police have launched an investigation into the case, with the head of the cadastral authority in Senec, Igor Svitek, also suspected of being involved, as he allowed the illegitimate transaction, even though the Special Prosecutor’s Office had blocked any manipulation with the property, case pending.

When SME daily got a scent of the case, the Special Prosecutor’s Office had agreed to speak to its reporters, but this was soon halted when the Attorney General’s Office assumed exclusive jurisdiction for the case and held the Special Prosecutor’s Office to confidentiality. The daily managed to get a copy of the letter of consent from 18 May 2012 anyway.

Now the police and the cadastral authority find themselves in a position where they are “not authorised to comment” on the case as the Attorney General took exclusive jurisdiction for it, with the office grabbing also the original dossier on the building from the land registry on 12 November after reporters started showing an interest in it.

At present the property is registered to a company close to Kocner named Gapeja, which itself is in bankruptcy, tactfully or not. Businessman Kocner, who is on the receiving end of the transaction, announced that he planned to assume the claims of the financing bank to the property, even though the block imposed by the Special Prosecutor’s Office is still in force. Incidentally, Kocner and Trnka have known each other closely for years.

Trnka failed in his attempt to re-run for the post of Attorney General after political games in parliament saw opposition candidate Jozef Centes win the vote 16 months ago. Since then, President Ivan Gasparovic has abused bureaucratic loopholes not to appoint Centes to the post, in what has become a farcical show of complete indifference to the pillars of democracy, ignoring the vote in parliament and Constitutional Court rulings. The irony is that Gasparovic questions Centes’ integrity to occupy the key post, while Trnka’s integrity was never questioned by the ageing President.

15 Comments for “Former Attorney General Suspect in Dubious Property Deal”

  1. Gordon

    Thanks for the replies. All the comments have been noted but I have to say I already knew all these issues and problems existed otherwise I should have bought a return ticket.
    Who is actually still living in Svk ? I wouldn’t mind a beer with some native english speakers now and again so if anyone fancies it let me know. I have a couple of local connections but need a lot more. If not then no worries can communicate through this site.

    • EXPAT

      Be careful what you wish for… some people are better off not being your friend on this site! Better to make firends with people who will support you, not to bash the country you could soon call home…. Slovakia has it’s draw backs, but so does every country in Europe. Supose George will jump on this, as he loves to bewilder and to proclaim his authority and excellence to us all. Be prepared for a lot of paperwork and redundant visits to the various departments. Otherwise it is nice here…. the people are good hard working people that I find to be well educated and decent people. George has just dealt with bottom feeders, as in any culture exist! Screw him!

      • George M

        Cowpat , I thought the Goblins had eaten you for lunch ? Ever tried suckin a Fisherman`s Friend old chap? Won`t half clear that writers block you have .

        Let`s get this correct. you`re the cretin we all take the Pea, as you are so blooming damp and pathetic …

        Gordon appears a nice, balanced guy, with his head well screwed on and has balls. We can find it in our heart to be friendly to him .

        When your wife sows your own manhood back on again Cowpat, perhaps we can then start admiring you, no ?

      • Gordon

        I have read a few of George’s posts, he is just venting his frustration from what I would imagine are bad personal experiences. I do sympathise, I haven’t even moved yet and come up against fraudulent paperwork, corrupt officials and mafia type individuals.
        No point in arguing amongst ourselves, I have yet to walk around Bratislava and hear a UK accent (apart from the odd group of lads over for weekend).
        I will even buy the first round :-)

        • George M

          Gordon , I don`t actually vent . I actually got over being frustrated years ago. I see myself as the website Town Crier , oh yea , oh yea , oh yea …News of the day etc .

          Not so Cowpat , who just cry`s and sobs, when anyone tells it how it really is, in his beloved cesspit called Slowvakia…

          • EXPAT

            George, I have had my issues here, but I also had the very same issue when I contracted in the UK…so which is better? I work for a very good company, I make a decent living doing what I do, so I have no gripe for Slovakia, only those that consistently put down the whole, when it is only a few that have spoiled the bunch. Your claims against me are almost humorous…yet I am not laughing. I have adapted and can say that I have accepted those imperfections in this world, it can’t all be golden! It is nice you settled in Austria now, I will have to see the postings on their English news site for your overwhelming posts of satisfaction. I don’t wine or cry, I only am saddened that those who have integrated themselves for so olong into a society, cannot find any positive aspects of this culture.

          • George M

            Cowpat , are you actually on drugs or medication ???

            I suspect you would have issues wherever you contacted? Still toilet cleaners I wanted everywhere, don`t forget the domestos when you clean the pan .

            ~~I don’t wine or cry, I only am saddened that those who have integrated themselves for so olong into a society, cannot find any positive aspects of this culture.~~~~

            Huh ??? Someone help me out here with a actual translation ???

  2. Gordon

    I am moving over to Slovakia in January from the UK. Been reading a lot of comments on this site by the same people. I have done a bit of business in Slovakia already and come up against a lot of dodgy practices but I think it will just add to the excitement.
    In the UK there are no opportunities anymore, the system has been raped by the capitalist system and the country is controlled by people that have already made their money. Plus the weather sucks.
    Slovakia is years behind the UK system, and despite having a huge bureaucratic system there are way too many loopholes that can be exploited by half intelligent criminals. That being said there are also countless opportunities for making a lot of cash whilst introducing proper business models without having to get involved in unscrupulous practices.

    • Ric

      The biggest differences I found was that:

      Many of the rich have had it easy for around 20 years. They opened business put in any manager on 1 quid per hour the cash rolled in. Mistakes were solved by breaking the rules. Not paying staff ect. So there is a gap for quality at a nice cost.

      Forget about fixing anything in court. If judges and presidents dont obey the rules, why should anyone else with power.

      There is also a lot less disposable income and impulse buying. The cash is concentrated in a smaller section of society. Jobless families dont get 25k a year, they relay on family or look though dustbins for things to sell.

      The mafia are folk heros. The society is nowhere near as causually violent as the UK North , but people are scared of them. So the little people don’t break the rules as often as back home.

      You need to know a local with connections.

      • George M

        Hello Gordon . I would agree with what both you and Ric say in the main . Not sure about the crooked dealing adding to the excitement thou Gordon? After a while it does become a bit wearing . I did many of the right things to do business here. Got to find business contacts at the highest level to get round the a huge bureaucratic system, using the loop holes and yes just ignore the Law …even if you don`t beak it , some jobsworth ass will find a unknown reason why you did . So it all evens it`s self out in the end .

        My Main problem was at the lowest level, Slowvak employee`s . Apart from being work shy, 99% of them were thieves, taking brides, pushing friends to sub contract, adding their cut etc … I even had one guy printing and claiming invoices for a company he did not work or own, in bid to manufacture his expense claims . In the end I gave up having to police every Slowvak employee and moved to Austria …thus far no problems there .

    • Dave C.

      Gordon
      Good luck with your move here. Your correct, there are many good business opportunities in the Sk but I hope you have the patience of a saint – things take for ever for the locals ( unless you have the right friends!) but as a foriegner you will have to time things with a calendar or tree growth rings.
      A couple of bits of advice – don’t believe the first thing any official says here, always ask why, ask for everything in writing, always get more than one quote for everything, physically check everthing and NEVER pay up front. The Slovaks appreciate decent employers and honest businesses, so you should do well.

  3. George M

    You know having lived and support Slowvakia for a number of years, with my thoughts, my idea`s, may advice, my complaints, my outrage, my money on tea&coffee and my taxes …one starts to become numb and just slide over headlines like these .

    No one who reads this comic, or the the sees TV news will be surprised by these accusation against this Slowvak Slug . The fact is, pictures of roadkill of everyday people is become almost as common as reading, yet another corruption scandal . I am no longer even shocked by any of these events .

    Come on folks….what is going on here ???

  4. Erich W

    Same circus, different tent!

  5. Dave C

    Is this yet another example of a simple system Slovakised to make it easy for the corrupt to manipulate?
    In most societies, the investigation of a crime is conducted by the police who then pass the evidence to the prosecutor who decides if it is strong enough to take to court and get a conviction – not here though, it appears everyone and the dog can obstruct both the police and the special prosecutor. No wonder police morale is so low, they try to do their job but face the spectre of Beanpole making lumps in the carpet or Toady fixing the courts. Of course, even if wrongdoing is discovered we can only expect a slap on the hand, a short term pay cut and then business as usual. It’s time some high profile people were occupying prison cells.

  6. alec hodges

    How ridiculous that the police should investigate such a trivial matter when they have so much work to do giving people parking tickets etc.This ex Attorney General is a pillar of Slovak society, a man that stands alone, above all others for his honesty, integrity and empathy for the normal rich in Slovakia. He should take this case of harassment to the European Court of Human Rights.

Leave a Reply

*

Photo Gallery

The Daily.SK, Language Sense, s.r.o., Bratislava © 2010