Posted by on 21 Jun 2012. Filed under Current Affairs, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Eurobarometer: Slovaks in Favour of EU Second Language

A recent Eurobarometer survey that looks into how citizens in the EU regard the use of foreign languages and multilingualism, has produced some interesting findings, with Slovakia among the top countries in favour of people having also a common language throughout Europe, i.e. English, but not so keen on watching films in their original language.

More than seven in ten Europeans (72%) agree that people in the EU should be able to speak more than one language in addition to their mother tongue, and they are also widely in favour of people being able to speak a common language, with around seven in ten (69%) respondents agreeing with this viewpoint. Hence Europeans, for the most part, support the EU’s vision that EU citizens should be able to speak at least two foreign languages.
All generations enjoyed the event (c) The Daily

Europe Day, celebrating diversity in the EU (c) The Daily

Europeans are more evenly divided on whether EU institutions should adopt a single language to communicate with European citizens, although the balance of opinion is in favour of this approach. Just over half of respondents (53%) agree that EU institutions should adopt a single language to communicate with European citizens, with just over one in five (22%) strongly agreeing with this view.

Opinions on whether or not European institutions should adopt a single language to communicate with citizens are broadly similar in EU15 and NMS12.
Overall agreement that the European institutions should adopt a single language to communicate with European citizens is highest in Slovakia (77%), followed by Spain and Cyprus (66%), and lowest in Finland (24%) and Estonia (32%).

The view that everyone in the EU should be able to speak a common language is most widespread in Italy (82%), Malta (79%), Portugal and Slovakia (77%) and Luxembourg (76%), and least widespread in Finland (40%), Latvia (46%) and Estonia (48%).

National variation is greatest in relation to preferences for watching foreign films and programmes, with respondents in Sweden (96%), Finland (95%), Denmark (93%) and the Netherlands (93%) particularly likely to favour subtitles and those in the Czech Republic (21%), Germany (22%), Spain (24%) and Slovakia (25%) least likely to do so.

For the full Eurobarometer report on Slovakia, click here

Leave a Reply

*

Photo Gallery

The Daily.SK, Language Sense, s.r.o., Bratislava © 2010