Posted by on 8 Jan 2013. Filed under Current Affairs, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Thousands of Part-Timers Set To Join Unemployed

According to an article today in daily Hospodarske Noviny, the number of people being registered so far with health insurers for part-time work contracts has plummeted after the government slapped heavy taxes on this kind of work agreement.

The daily states that only about 6,400 part-time employees have been registered so far, a mere 1% of the total for 2012, when 640,000 people  were employed in this way. As employers are ready to point out, this could also be because of the government hike in taxes for part-timers from just a few percent to over 35%, making the employment of part-time employees almost a thing of the past. 

The government was forewarned that the move could cause problems for many students, pensioners and other part-time workers, like the several hundred that work in opinion poll agencies, for instance. This did not stop the government from going ahead with its contrived system, however, and so its plan to reduce unemployment could backfire and create the perfect conditions once again for people working for cash in hand, meaning no taxes at all for the state purse.

17 Comments for “Thousands of Part-Timers Set To Join Unemployed”

  1. alec hodges

    Sorry to disappoint you Arthur but I don’t lend money for profit and I am too busy to dabble in the secondhand car market, so I am afraid that should you wish to pawn your Porsche it would be best to look elsewhere.However I do a nice line in black, silk ladies underwear, should you or your good lady ever need to update your wardrobe.

    • George M

      You`re an Anne Summers franchisee Smug ??? Hell ,the mind boggles …

      The Turbo beast is in the shed at the moment, far too wet and snowy for that. The 4×4 is getting an winter airing at the mo.

      OK,so sleeping alone tonight, the lady is on Doc night duty .

  2. Donal Greene

    Looks like ‘cash in hand’ is the way to go. Means one can offer lower prices to individual clients and not have to feel guilty about lining the pockets of those who do not need it.

    • George M

      Thank you for that comment Mr Duck …..I am sure the forum will think on it and then burst into laughter …..

      • Donal Greene

        Think on it? Not exactly using the best grammar there are we George?

        • George M

          Are you a clone of Cowpat, or just plain daft as a brush, because you are a Paddy ?

          BTW. Any update on the completion of that Open Uni degree yet , 2015. 2016, 2020 ?

        • alec hodges

          Punctuation Donal
          This site is hardly going to set the literary world alight, but if you nit pick then at least display perfectionism yourself.I suspect most people are more interested in the content than how it is written.

    • Dave C.

      Donal
      A black ecconomy based on “cash in hand” deals that could involve over 10% of the population would be of benefit only to certain parties. The workers would only be offered low, low wages increasing poverty levels, companies would enjoy higher profits but tax revenue would plummet leaving responsible companies and their workers to plug the gap. Slovakia couldn’t collect all the tax due under the old system which suggests any “fiddles” would prove attractive to the less honest in society. Then again BnM supporters appear to come from that branch of the population so there maybe method in his madness.

  3. alec hodges

    To be fair to Mr Fico he promised Slovakia a socialist leaning state without stating who the beneficiaries would be.As a result of this legislation I anticipate even more village people arriving at our door to borrow money to feed their families. Not huge amounts, usually 1 to 5 euro which they always pay back. Nearly all are non Roma but all are decent folk in distress. When I see the inactivity of the Roman Catholic church and all its christian followers, and the downright greed of the political oligarchs, I openly state that I am ashamed to be a member of the human race. Absolutely ashamed.

  4. EXPAT


    Slightly off topic but of interest, a good friend of ours who processes mortgage applications has noted a number of doctors, teachers etc who have full time posts AND dohodu contracts with the same place of work, which makes their gross earnings look good on the application form. Maybe BnM should concentrate some real effort on those employers and employees who abuse the system rather than adopting regulations that have such a negative effect on the general population”

    D.C. – Not off topic – Spot on! Where I see the issue is a lot of people in full time employment with these so called side jobs or part time employment is the issue…and yes, many are employed in the same company twice or three times for work that should be done under one contract, not three!
    Sorry about your situation, perhaps you could volunteer somwhere and write the time off as a donation to reduce your income pains!

    • George M

      I not with interest EX pat has become COWPAT again ? Anyone confused ?

      Let me ask you my little pile of cow dung, do you write here meaning to say something profound and meaningful and then just forget why you started ? You posts make no sense at all and add no new info to the debate .

  5. George M

    DC. It would be unSlowvak like to address the real problem ….better to pick on one or two groups to `blame` , the Roma being the most popular normally and then create a fudge, new rules that if you are a member of Smer or the President you just ignore or perhaps just to suite the few .

  6. Dave C.

    As a potential “victim” of this rediculous move I have to wonder exactly what BnM is hoping to achieve. I work a few hours a week on a part-time contract, the most hours I have “worked” is 9 – 10 hours, most weeks its 3 -4, some weeks none at all. The costs to my employer have risen to 35% so he has no incentive to increase my hours even if he could. My net pay, even though its only a bit of pin money, will drop by 14% because I will be obliged to contribute to “social insurances” – none of which I need. I really only found some work to save getting cabin fever, keep my mind active and help in my Slovak studies. The other options that are open to me are non starters as I would end up paying more in insurances than I actually would earn. In short, as it stands at the moment, its not worth getting out of bed, I may as well stay at home and take up wood carving and posting comments on here.
    The article is correct in that the “black economy” will increase, tax revenue will fall and no doubt claims for benefits, such as there are, will rise. A more reasonable approach would have been to limit the hours a “dohodu” worker can work in a week which would have forced employers to address full time employment for those “part-timers” who actually work “full-time”.
    Slightly off topic but of interest, a good friend of ours who processes mortgage applications has noted a number of doctors, teachers etc who have full time posts AND dohodu contracts with the same place of work, which makes their gross earnings look good on the application form. Maybe BnM should concentrate some real effort on those employers and employees who abuse the system rather than adopting regulations that have such a negative effect on the general population.

    • Dave C.

      Having decided that being self-employed is a better option than the daylight robbery presented to both employers and employees under the new “dohodu” rules, I did some research on the SVK Govt websites and was pleasantly suprised – business registration forms and information in English, new single point of service in the offices etc. Oh!, how reality differs from the fiction presented to placate EU concerns about “ease of doing business”.
      Arrived at the Registry, helpfull staff member ( No English) gave me the room number I needed. Arrived at the room to find it locked, enquired at the office next door which resulted in various bodies emerging but unable to explain why the office was closed. After much debate I was ushered into another office – non the staff could read the English documents I had provided or could speak English. The information on the govt. website quickly joined other works of fiction as by sign language, Borat English and my weak Slovak I discovered that I could not, as advertised, pay my fees in cash thereby needing a trip to the post office where issuing Euro20.00 in stamps took 20 minutes and a calculator. Another omission from the website required a trip to the Procurators Office, no address given, just the name of one of the longest roads in the city! to obtain a criminal record check ( cost Euro 4 – more stamps needed!). The office has no signs, the staff don’t speak a word of English, German or French and the forms are in Slovak only. In addition the staff were the most arrogant and unhelpfull bunch of non-jobs I have ever encountered. ” Come back tomorrow” was the only meaningful advice I recieved. When I asked ” Morning or afternoon?” I got a shrug of the shoulders as a response. My impression of my experiences today – BULLSH*T from top to bottom, no one gives a damn, take the simplest of procedures and make it as convoluted, time consuming and difficult as possible and posting dribble on the internet is a national pastime. Who do I send my bill to for the time and shoe leather I have wasted?

      • Dave C.

        Update – I can only presume someone reads these posts. I was welcomed with a smile and ushered to the front of the queue for my criminal record check – 4 Euros for a blank bit of paper but Hey!. Arrived at Business Registry – done and dusted in five minutes, pick my licence up on Friday even got a writen note with the date, time and office number – just shows what they can do with a bit of effort!

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