Posted by on 3 Dec 2012. Filed under Politics, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Trnka Won’t Leave AG Office Without a Fight

Former attornye general Dobroslav Trnka, who has become ebroiled in a dubious case surrounding the illegitimate transfer of a block of flats near Bratislava, says he would step down from his current post of Deputy attorney general only if two former opposition interior ministers Lucia Zitnanska and Daniel Lipsic can show a better way on how the case could have been resolved.

Former AG Dobroslav Trnka

In a statement to the media today, Trnka said that if he receives some expert proposal from the two former interior ministers that would deal appropriately with the aggreived parties in the case, then he would think about stepping down. Zitnanska, Lipsic and others have been calling for Trnka to be recalled, but interim attorney general Ladislav Tichy does not plan any sanction against Trnka, even though he condemns the way he dealt with the case.

Trnka is being accused of abusing public office after endorsing the transfer of a block of flats in Bernolakovo called Glance House, despite the property being frozen by the Special Prosecutor’s Office in a dispute between the partners of the developer. Trnka gave his consent to the transfer to Jana Šlachtová, representing the partner CDI from London, and the land registry let it go through. She in turn was advised by well-connected businessman Marian Kocner, who just happens to be Trnka’s long-term friend.

The transfer to the company Gapeja close to Kocner was eventually halted by the interim attorney general last week.

9 Comments for “Trnka Won’t Leave AG Office Without a Fight”

  1. George M

    Juki does not believe that I walk on water …perhaps YOU should tell him Loghead . Amen

  2. alec hodges

    In the EU only Romania, Bulgaria, Greece and Italy are seem as more corrupt than Slovakia / 2012 transparency international. Doesn’t sound too bad until you look at the countries that are in the same bracket. In deference to Greece and Italy, perceived corruption is the appropriate term whilst in Romania Slovakia and Bulgaria it is real everyday corruption as we can see from the circumstances outlined in the article. If it’s any consolation to the average Slovak SME voter the situation is worse in both Russia and the Ukraine.

  3. alec hodges

    You are wrong Dave; they have a code of conduct based on corruption and theft. For politicians and judiciary it’s the only game in town.

  4. Dave C

    Obviously Slovakia does not have a Code of Conduct for Public Servants – something else they haven’t quite got round to doing yet.

  5. Losgar

    Zitnanska never was an interior minister. I think you meant ministers of justice JB.

    Cockroaches never leave the house willingly. I saw when Trnka was questioned by Lipsic by the parlamentary commitee. Lipsic also told Trnka he should be sitting in a cell right now.
    Trnka just follows Fico’s tactics – if they find you dirty make sure, while you “wash it off”, you sprinkle some dirt on the others /oposition/.

  6. Ric

    I suggest that he could have done nothing as the deeds were frozen.

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