Posted by on 5 Apr 2012. Filed under Current Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Top news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Harabin Remembers Victims of Armenian Genocide

The Forum of Armenian Associations of Europe (FAAE) reports how Supreme Court chairman Stefan Harabin took part in the wreath-laying ceremony in Bratislava in memory of the victims of Armenian Genocide.

Armenian memorial Khachkars (c) Rita Willaert

Harabin was joined by President of the Armenian Constitutional Court, Gagik Harutyunyan, Chairman of RA Court of Cassation Arman Mkrtumyan and FAAE Chairman, Ashot Grigorian. Harabin drew attention to the law in Slovakia that makes denial of Armenian Genocide a crime, punishable by a 5-year jail sentence.

Harabin’s noted that the sentence  was applicable to any Turk, regardless of rank or post. Together with his visitors, they agreed to boost efforts to get other countries to adopt similar laws, with Slovakia the first in the EU to do so. In this regard, Harabin said he was ready to help France prepare its own law on Armenian Genocide denial.

4 Comments for “Harabin Remembers Victims of Armenian Genocide”

  1. Andreas

    Ridiculous .

  2. Dave Crawford

    Bobby no Mates just warming his chair and Toady crawls out into the daylight.
    Is it SK custom for the tea boy to represent the state?
    Harabin’s Law only applies to Turks? – How enlightened! Still I suppose locking up white Slovaks parading in their Nazi emblems and celebrating the SKs role in the extermination of the Jews and Roma in WWII would involve saying goodbye to some of his mates and make him unpopular.
    I am sure France can and will manage without him. Maybe he should devote more of his time to doing the job he’s paid to do and finally allow an open inspection of his departments finances. Fat chance now Bobby is back in town.

  3. Lady Ga Ga

    Come the glorious day , to deny you are NOT Slovak will be punished by the rops and gallows .

  4. David

    Generally, whether something is or is not considered genocide is based on politics and sentiment. How, therefore, can it be right to ban political opinions and taking sides in the debate? I could understand it if there was a significant Armenian population in Slovakia and people were deliberately offending them, but I don’t see that. It won’t be long before all freedom of expression is banned.

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